THEJABBERWOCK

 

Latest Update: July 4, 2010

Copyright © 2004-2010 Ross Hannan and Corry Arnold. All Rights Reserved.

To keep this page a manageable size the history of the Jabberwock and the page of Jabberwock Art

now have their own separate pages.

Photograph from the Campbell Coe Collection

The Jabberwock, 2901 Telegraph Avenue (at Russell Street), Berkeley, CA

The information on this page has been researched and compiled by Ross Hannan and Corry Arnold

with a great deal of assistance and support from Tom Weller, Earl Crabb, Jef Jaisun, the late Bill "Jolly Blue" Ehlert, David Bennett Cohen, ED Denson, Colin Hill, Jesse Cahn, Evelyn Miller Kerr, Hank Bradley, Denise Kaufman, Paul Arnoldi, Gary M Smith, Phil Greenberg, the late Mark Spoelstra, Joe McDonald, Barry Melton, Bill Miles, Anthony Harland, Rick Bockner.  Thanks are also due to Cactus Pete Anderson who contributed significantly to the research.

 

A List of Jabberwock Shows

 

  Date Jabberwock, 2901 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, CA Some Interesting Notes
Sunday 16 June 1963 Flamenco: David Jones, Fred Mojia, David Rubio Researcher Bill Miles found this listing for a “Dinner Special” (cost: $1.70) in the San Francisco Chronicle. David Rubio (1934-2000) was a London born musician who travelled to Spain where he refined his flamenco guitar style.  He would later be recognised as the maker of a range of high quality stringed instruments including guitars, lutes, harpsichords, violins, violas and cellos. Federico Mejia started to play guitar at 9 yrs old, after feeling too shy to dance, and performed regularly at the Spaghetti Factory in San Francisco and at the Northern and Southern Renaissance Fairs.  Meija continues to tutor in Santa Cruz to this day.
  1964 Bukka White  
  1964 Ian and Sylvia  
Thursday 30 January 1964 Dick Oxtot Trio  
Saturday 01 February 1964 Dick Oxtot Trio  
Thursday 06 February 1964 Dick Oxtot Trio  
Saturday 08 February 1964 Dick Oxtot Trio  
Thursday 13 February 1964 Dick Oxtot Trio  
Saturday 15 February 1964 Dick Oxtot Trio  
Thursday 20 February 1964 Dick Oxtot Trio  
  1965 Frankie Lee Sims ED Denson noted that Frankie Lee Sims did one of his last, and sad, public performances at the Jabberwock.
Saturday 22 February 1964 Dick Oxtot Trio Bob Dylan dropped by before his concert at the Berkeley Community Theater.
Sunday 04 April 1965 Trevor Koehler's Quartet [3pm to 7pm]  
Sunday 11 April 1965 Trevor Koehler's Quartet [3pm to 7pm]  
Sunday 18 April 1965 Trevor Koehler's Quartet [3pm to 7pm]  
Friday 23 April 1965 The Freedom Singers Rochester scholar Bill Miles has uncovered a number of Jabberwock dates from 1965 in the listings of the San Francisco Chronicle – one of which was for a performance on April 23 by the Freedom Singers. The Freedom Singers were originally formed in 1962 to raise money for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and their songs and music played an important role in the Civil Rights movement.  One of the group's key founders was Cordell Hull Reagon, known for his many nonviolence training workshops and anti-segregation efforts in the Albany, Georgia area. Other founding members included Bernice Johnson (who later married Reagon), Charles Neblett and Rutha Harris. They traveled widely and won new fans at the 1963 Newport Folk Festival. By the time they played the Jabberwock, the line-up was an all male affair with Chuck Neblett, Emory Harris and Nashville native, Matthew Jones. 
Sunday 25 April 1965 Trevor Koehler's Quartet [3pm to 7pm]  
Thursday 29 April 1965 Son House Eddie James "Son" House, Jr. (1902-1988) was the ninth of seventeen brothers born in Riverton, Mississippi.  After killing a man, allegedly in self-defense, he was sentenced to 15 years at Mississippi State Penitentiary, also known as Parchman Farm, After serving less than two years in 1928 and 1929, House began a sporadic recording career with Paramount in 1930 and later, in the early 40s, with Alan Lomax for the Archive of Folk Culture, a collection of recordings for the Archive of American Folk Song at the Library of Congress. 

Son House made some powerful blues records in the late 1930s and then “disappeared”.  His rediscovery by folk and blues collectors Nick Perls, Dick Waterman and Phil Spiro in June 1964 in Rochester, New York, where he was working for the New York Central Railroad, led to tours throughout the US and Europe.  It also led to a second recording career, this time with CBS records. House, with his musical skills intact, was a galvanizing event on the folk scene. 
Friday 30 April 1965 Son House  
Saturday 01 May 1965 Son House  
Sunday 02 May 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening) "Jazz on a Sunday Afternoon" with The Four Diemnsions - a local jazz combo who were to be the Sunday afternoon house band for the next six months.
Thursday 06 May 1965 Alice Stuart Alice Stuart was a child of the folk music revival and Hootenanny era of the 1960s.  Born in the Pacific Northwest, Alice Stuart was initially a coffeehouse and folk club singer, beginning at Seattle’s Pamir House (or P House) before moving down the coast to Los Angeles in 1963. She was invited, by Barry Olivier, to appear at the 1964 Berkeley Folk Festival and made quite an impression on those attending.  Also in 1964 she released her debut album All The Good Times on Chris Strachwitz’s Arhoolie label.  By early 1966, Alice had been, albeit briefly, a member of Frank Zappa's Mothers of Invention and was credited on their first album, Freak Out.  Later in the 60s Alice formed her first all electric band, Snake with Bob Jones from the We Five.  After many years touring, Alice still plays regular live shows with her blues band Formally.
Friday 07 May 1965 Alice Stuart  
Saturday 08 May 1965 Alice Stuart  
Sunday 09 May 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Thursday 13 May 1965 Charles O'Hegarty Whilst mis-advertised as Charles O. Hagarty, O'Hegarty was a singer of the traditional songs of the sailors including shanties, songs of bravery and sentimental ballads by seafarers who had left their loved ones at home.
Friday 14 May 1965 Charles O'Hegarty  
Saturday 15 May 1965 Charles O'Hegarty  
Sunday 16 May 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Thursday 20 May 1965 Jean Redpath Jean Redpath was born in Edinburgh and a singer of Scottish ballads.  She arrived in the United States in 1961 and within a few months found herself in Greenwich Village  playing with Ramblin' Jack Elliot and a young Bobby Dylan. An appearance in a hootenanny at Gerde's Folk City brought the offer of a booking, won a rave review in the New York Times, and ensured that Jean had very much arrived on the American folk scene.  Jean Redpath has performed much of the work of Scottish poet Robert Burns set to music.
Friday 21 May 1965 Jean Redpath  
Saturday 22 May 1965 Jean Redpath  
Sunday 23 May 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Sunday 30 May 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Sunday 06 June 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Sunday 13 June 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Sunday 20 June 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Friday 25 June 1965 Pine Valley Boys  
Saturday 26 June 1965 Pine Valley Boys  
Sunday 27 June 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Sunday 04 July 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Sunday 11 July 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Wednesday 14 July 1965 Robbie Basho Born in 1940 in Baltimore, Maryland, Robbie Basho was bought up as Daniel R. Robinson Jr., a name inherited from his adoptive parents.   After discovering the Japanese haiku poet Matsuo Basho he changed his name into Robbie Basho, the musician.  He adopted an unusual raga influenced style of playing 12 string guitar.  Robbie Basho lived in Mrs. Sherrill's apartment building adjacent to the club along with Bruce Barthol, Barry Melton and Paul Armstrong (all members of Country Joe and the Fish) before leaving the apartment building to be replaced by Joe McDonald.  He played 12 string solo guitar very much in the John Fahey style.  Basho, who died in 1986, retained copies of numerous live and private recordings of his music; perhaps one day they will be given the undoubted attention they deserve.
Thursday 15 July 1965 Robbie Basho  
Friday 16 July 1965 Terry Garwaithe Terry Garthwaite was a local folk musician. She would later “go electric” with a band called Gourmet’s Delight, who evolved into the Joy of Cooking which were at one time managed and promoted by Bill Ehlert. She remains an active artist to this day (www.terrygarthwaite.com).  Terry also played thee JAbebrwock with here brother, Tim, as The Garthwaites.
Sunday 18 July 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Sunday 25 July 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Sunday 01 August 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Sunday 08 August 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Sunday 15 August 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Sunday 22 August 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Sunday 29 August 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Sunday 05 September 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Monday 06 September 1965 Closed  
Sunday 12 September 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Monday 13 September 1965 Closed  
Wednesday 15 September 1965 Paul Armstrong  
Thursday 16 September 1965 Paul Armstrong  
Friday 17 September 1965 The Wry Catchers  
Saturday 18 September 1965 The Wry Catchers  
Sunday 19 September 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Monday 20 September 1965 Closed  
Tuesday 21 September 1965 Alan Higgins  
Wednesday 22 September 1965 Chris Selsor  
Thursday 23 September 1965 Chris Selsor  
Friday 24 September 1965 David and Tina Meltzer Since the 1950s David Meltzer has been a renowned Beat poet, writer and orator.  He had previously performed improvisational jazz duets on acoustic guitar with Jim Gurley who would go on to play with Big Brother and the Holding Company.  After releasing two albums under the name of Serpent Power for Vanguard Records, Vic Briggs who had been the lead guitarist with The Animals persuaded the Meltzers to sign with Capitol Records for the release of Green Morning.  and liked Poet Song tremendously but thought he could produce a better album. He asked us to make a demo-tape for him to pitch to his bosses at Capitol.  Later, with Joe Edmiston on gutbucket bass, Lonnie Feiner (bass), Greg Lasser (banjo, rhythm guitar, harmony vocals), Tina Meltzer (vocals, rhythm guitar) and David on vocals, guitar, mouth harp, The Snopes County Camp Followers and, in true Joe Bussard style, Billy Buckett and the Teleportts would get together.  It appears that they much preferred rehearsing to playing actual shows and by all accounts any attempt to record these two elusive groups "were cut short due to hysterical giggling".   Forthunately a few recordings do exist - including a wonderful rendition of "He Was A Friend of Mine" http://meltzerville.com/snopes_county_camp_followers.htm.
Saturday 25 September 1965 David and Tina Meltzer  
Sunday 26 September 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Monday 27 September 1965 Alan Higgins  
Tuesday 28 September 1965 Alan Higgins  
Wednesday 29 September 1965 Larry Hanks Larry Hanks is a singer, guitarist, and trumpist (Jew’s harp) who sings a wide variety of traditional American styles, including old time country and cowboy songs, ballads and blues.  Hanks was also a member of The Instant Action Jug Band that would later evelove in to Country Joe and the Fish.  He apparently recorded an album of old-timey songs for Takoma Records, but the producer put echo on the recording.  Hanks took the master tape and refused to return it, considering the recording inauthentic.  Trump is the old Scottish name for a Jew's Harp.   
Thursday 30 September 1965 Larry Hanks  
Friday 01 October 1965 The Times Square Two Peter Elbling and Michel Choquette formed The Times Square Two in Vancouver in 1964, moved to California in 1965, then to New York in 1966.  The act broke up early in 1970. Peter has been living in Los Angeles since then, where he has worked in improvisational theatre and as a television actor.  He has also made a name for himself as a writer. Michel stayed in New York for a few years, where he became one of the original contributing editors of National Lampoon. Since then he has worked on various film, theatre and publishing projects. Since 1984 he has been teaching screenwriting and comedy writing at McGill University and Concordia University in Montreal.  In the act, Peter's name was Mycroft Partner, and Michel's was Andrew I (as in "my partner and I). 
To quote from an interview Peter Elbling did with Phantompalooza in 2005:  I used to do a lot of mime. I had done a lot of physical comedy – I had been part of a comedy team called the Times Square Two which started in Canada, and consisted of myself and a French Canadian guy called Michel Choquette.

I’d left England and come to Canada in 1964, and was hitch-hiking my way and trying to be a folk singer, and I hitch-hiked to Calgary, and became the resident singer at this place called The Depression. [laughter]. It was the first job I ever had!  And about a month into the gig, this young woman came in with long blonde hair and asked if she could sing. She opened her mouth and we all fell backwards because, she sounded like Joan Baez. We asked her name and she said “Joni Anderson”—who later became Joni Mitchell. So we were the two opening acts.

A little while later this guy called Michel Choquette came in and it turned out we both shared a love of Twenties music, and we sang a song together called “Wish I Could Shimmy Like My Sister Kate”. From there we met up in Vancouver and became a comedy act called The Times Square Two. We went down to L.A., got better and better, went back East around ’66 and that’s when we started to hit it. We played on the Johnny Carson show, and the Merv Griffin Show, and Kraft Music Hall, the Smothers Brothers, we toured the states doing concerts and all that sort of stuff.

We did a lot of choreography in the act – our stuff was very physical. We split up in 1970 and I joined The Committee, and I did a lot of physical comedy with them, it was a lot like Second City.
 
Saturday 02 October 1965 The Times Square Two  
Sunday 03 October 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Monday 04 October 1965 Closed  
Tuesday 05 October 1965 Dave Cohen This is the first appearance of New York City native David Bennett Cohen at the Jabberwock.  David has performed multiple genres of music from folk and blues to that for which he is perhaps best known, the innovative organ sounds of Country Joe and the Fish.  David continues to teach and perform many forms of piano and guitar music and has released a number of albums and videos.  Extensive touring in 2005 with the Country Joe Band and the resultant CD release demonstrated that David has lost none of his original verve.
Wednesday 06 October 1965 The Singers' Circle with Barry Olivier  
Thursday 07 October 1965 Robbie Basho  
Friday 08 October 1965 The Step Sisters  
Saturday 09 October 1965 The Step Sisters  
Sunday 10 October 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Monday 11 October 1965 Joe McDonald, Peter Krug, Paul Gilbert, Betty Reid, Carl Shrager, Bill Steele (MC) A "Topical Song Workshop and Concert" performed as a benefit for DMB Publications - Rag Baby and Et Tu.  Whilst Joe McDonald had already been given the handle “Country Joe” by ED Denson, he was still playing regular acoustic sets under his own name.  Rag Baby is Country Joe’s own magazine and record label that still run today; albeit the magazine now in electronic form has remained work in progress for the past few years.  Rag Baby Records continues to release albums by both Joe and a few others. Et Tu was a short-lived magazine that Joe whilst edited in Los Angeles.  The first issue came out in August 1964 before McDonald headed to the Bay Area to become a beatnik. Advertised in Issue 2 of Rag Baby as a "songwriters' contest".
Tuesday 12 October 1965 Dave Cohen  
Wednesday 13 October 1965 The Singers' Circle with Barry Olivier plus a guest appearance by Ale Ekstrom playing "Deep Water" on his concertina Ale Ekstrom is a long-time Sausalito "water" resident and concertina player.  Many years later Ekstrom could still be found in the open spaces of Sausalito playing traditional maritime music with Julia Gilden.  On April 2, 1966, The Firehouse (a venue open only for a short time) in San Francisco presented The Wildflower supported by Ale Extrom and His Conceptina.  Given the undoubted humour of the Firehouse's poster artist, I am sure this is a deliberate misspelling.   
Thursday 14 October 1965 Robbie Basho  
Friday 15 October 1965 Possibly Peter Krug Bay Area singer/songwriter Peter Krug appears on the flip side of the first Rag Baby EP playing "Fire in the City" later recorded by the Grateful Dead as a backing band for Jon Hendricks) and "Johnny's Gone To War".  Krug also appeared occasionally at the Jabberwock hoots.
Saturday 16 October 1965 Possibly Peter Krug  
Sunday 17 October 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening)  
Monday 18 October 1965 Closed  
Friday 22 October 1965 The Wry Catchers, Ale Ekstrom Not to be confused with the similarly named Texas garage band, The Wry Catchers included a capella singer and author Hav Gefter (1931-2006).
Saturday 23 October 1965 The Wry Catchers, Ale Ekstrom  
Sunday 24 October 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot (evening) The Four Dimensions were a local jazz combo.
Monday 25 October 1965 Closed  
Tuesday 26 October 1965 Cy Koch Cy Koch is listed as an interpretaive guitarist.
Wednesday 27 October 1965 Singers Circle with Barry Olivier  
Thursday 28 October 1965 Robbie Basho  
Friday 29 October 1965 Joe McDonald, ED Denson, Pat Sullivan, Pete Winslow (Poet)  
Saturday 30 October 1965 Country Joe McDonald, Pat Sullivan, Pete Winslow (Poet)  
Sunday 31 October 1965 The Four Dimensions (afternoon); Hoot with Paul Armstrong (evening)  
Monday 01 November 1965 Closed  
Tuesday 02 November 1965 Cy Koch  
Wednesday 03 November 1965 Singers Circle with Barry Olivier  
Thursday 04 November 1965 Robbie Basho  
Friday 05 November 1965 Larry Hanks, Chris Selsor, Pete Winslow Pete Winslow was a satirical poet.
Saturday 06 November 1965 Larry Hanks, Chris Selsor, Pete Winslow  
Sunday 07 November 1965 Hoot with Paul Armstrong Kitty Mohle reports in "Rag Baby" that The Jabberwock Hoots on Sunday nights with Paul Armstrong are as disconnected as ever.  However, some very good people have started appearing there, like Phil Greenberg (folk and beautiful flamenco), Danny Paik (blues and ?), and a new voice from San Diego, Karen Williams (soft songs and spirituals).  The best part of the evening starts after the formal Hoot is over and there is a sort of folk Free-for-All which is, to say the least, rather strange, but very enjoyable. 
Monday 08 November 1965 Closed  
Wednesday 10 November 1965 Singers Circle with Barry Olivier  
Thursday 11 November 1965 Robbie Basho  
Sunday 14 November 1965 Hoot with Paul Armstrong  
Monday 15 November 1965 Closed  
Wednesday 17 November 1965 Singers Circle with Barry Olivier  
Thursday 18 November 1965 Robbie Basho  
Friday 19 November 1965 Don Crawford Don Crawford was a folk singer who would go on to pen the score for “C’mon, Let’s Live a Little”.
Saturday 20 November 1965 Don Crawford  
Sunday 21 November 1965 Hoot with Paul Armstrong  
Monday 22 November 1965 Larry Hanks, Chris Selsor  
Tuesday 23 November 1965 Larry Hanks, Chris Selsor  
Wednesday 24 November 1965 The Singers' Circle with Barry Olivier Barry Olivier was a guitar teacher, was the founder of the Berkeley Folk Festival in 1958.  He still plays the Bay Area with his wife Alice.
Thursday 25 November 1965 Robbie Basho  
Friday 26 November 1965 John Fahey with ED Denson on harmonica.  John Fahey had grown up in Maryland, where he had become an accomplished guitarist in bluegrass and other folk styles.  After cutting some 78s for Joe Bussard’s Fonotone Records label under the name of Blind Thomas, Fahey evolved his own unique and groundbreaking approach to the acoustic guitar, and he founded Takoma Records to release his own music, and that of his alter ego Blind Joe Death, privately.  Fahey went from UC Berkeley to UCLA (where he was in a jug band that evolved into Canned Heat—Fahey refused to “go electric” so Henry Vestine was drafted) for graduate study in ethnomusicology.  By 1966 Fahey had returned to Berkeley, where he was a regular at The Jabberwock and other folk venues.
Although paying little attention to electric music, Fahey’s unique compositional style and phenomenal guitar technique was a significant influence on many Berkeley musicians, particularly Country Joe McDonald. For more on Fahey, see www.johnfahey.com.

 
      Takoma principal ED Denson played harmonica along with Fahey for this night’s performance which was recorded (4 Track) by Takoma Records.  Sadly, the recording was never released and the original tapes no longer exist.  The following compositions were performed:

How Long
Variations on Eck Robertson
On the Banks of the Owchita
Durgan Park
The Dance of the Inhabitants
I am the Resurection
The Revolt of the Dyke Brigade
The Great San Bernardino Birthday Party
The Death of the Clayton Peacock
When the Springtime Comes Again
Orinda/Moraga
Some Summer Day, part 1 with ED Denson on harmonica
Southern Medeley
101 is a Hard Road toTravel
Some Summer Day, part 2
Willie Moore
Le Vieux Soulard Et Sa Femme with ED Denson on harmonica
I Woke Up One Morning in May with ED Denson on harmonica
 
Saturday 27 November 1965 John Fahey It is reported of John Fahey:  In 1963 and 1964, while a graduate student in folklore and mythology at the University of California at Los Angeles, he tracked down the missing blues singers Bukka White and Skip James, and in doing so played a major part in the acoustic blues revival of the time.
Sunday 28 November 1965 Hoot with Paul Armstrong  
Monday 29 November 1965 Closed  
Tuesday 30 November 1965 Larry Hanks, Chris Selsor  
Wednesday 01 December 1965 The Singers' Circle with Barry Olivier  
Thursday 02 December 1965 Robbie Basho  
Friday 03 December 1965 Ken Spiker Ken Spiker was a flamenco guitarist.  Flamenco music was an important component of the 50s and 60s folk revival. Since it turned out not to be the basis for rock bands, Flamenco has drifted out of the mainstream, but at this time it was still a significant part of the folk scene.
Saturday 04 December 1965 Ken Spiker  
Sunday 05 December 1965 Joe McDonald and others Advertised as a Folk Benefit with "over 10 artists".  
Monday 06 December 1965 Closed  
Tuesday 07 December 1965 Larry Hanks, Chris Selsor  
Wednesday 08 December 1965 The Singers' Circle with Barry Olivier  
Thursday 09 December 1965 Robbie Basho Basho was advertised as playing "delta blues, creole dances, raga textured music".  
Friday 10 December 1965 Mike Cooney The Barb ad says "banjo contest winner".  Mike Cooney had won the banjo contest at the 1963 Monterey Folk Festival. The judges (Rodney and Doug Dillard and Billy Ray Lathum) found Cooney’s frailing (traditional) style to be more worthy than the high speed three-finger (Bill Keith style) bluegrass picking of the intensely competitive Jerry Garcia (appearing in The Wildwood Boys along with Ken Frankel and David Nelson).  "I wish I could say Jerry won," says Rodney Dillard, "but he didn't. He felt for sure he was gonna have it because he played this real fancy bluegrass style — not the greatest in the world, bless him. We gave it to a guy who was a little more creative, actually a folk singer who frailed the banjo, named Mike Cooney. And none of the bluegrass people could understand why we did it. All the bluegrass nazis were really mad."  Kathy and Carol regularly opened for Cooney.
Saturday 11 December 1965 Mike Cooney  
Sunday 12 December 1965 Hoot  
Monday 13 December 1965 Closed  
Tuesday 14 December 1965 Larry Hanks, Chris Selsor  
Wednesday 15 December 1965 The Singers' Circle with Barry Olivier  
Thursday 16 December 1965 Robbie Basho  
Friday 17 December 1965 The Enigmas, Blind Ebbets Field "Blind Ebbets Field" was actually Barry Melton, guitarist with Country Joe and the Fish.  Melton took the name from the home of the Brooklyn Dodgers – who played at Ebbetts Field before they moved to Los Angeles after the 1957 season.  A number of the musicians occasionally adopted alternate personas, Jorma Kaukonen taking "Blind Thomas Jefferson Airplane" (or “Blind Lemon Jefferson Airplane), Steve Mann was "Little Son Goldfarb" and guitarist Tom Hobson, who recorded the wonderful Quah with Kaukonen, took the name "Blind Outrage".  At this time, Barry and Bruce Barthol were living next door to the Jabberwock and regularly foraging for food after customers had eaten. 
Saturday 18 December 1965 The Enigmas, Blind Ebbets Field The Enigmas were a vocal trio led by multi-instrumentalist Dick Oxtot. Oxtot was a mainstay of the Berkeley jazz and blues scene of the 1960s. Between 1963 and 1965, the Dick Oxtot Jazz Band made several recordings with Janis Joplin whilst she was visiting San Francisco. Oxtot was shot dead at the age of 83 in 2001.  Oxtot was joined in the trio by Jack Andrews and Juanita
Oribello.
Sunday 19 December 1965 Hoot  
Monday 20 December 1965 Closed for Christmas Vacation  
Tuesday 21 December 1965 Closed for Christmas Vacation  
Wednesday 22 December 1965 Closed for Christmas Vacation  
Thursday 23 December 1965 Closed for Christmas Vacation  
Friday 24 December 1965 Closed for Christmas Vacation  
Saturday 25 December 1965 Closed for Christmas Vacation  
Sunday 26 December 1965 Closed for Christmas Vacation  
Monday 27 December 1965 Closed for Christmas Vacation  
Tuesday 28 December 1965 Larry Hanks, Chris Selsor  
Wednesday 29 December 1965 The Singers' Circle with Barry Olivier Barry Olivier wrote the following ditty for Morris "Moe" Moskowitz (1921-1997), founder of The Paperback Bookshop on Shattuck Avenue in 1959, moving to Telegraph Avenue in 1963 and being renamed Moe’s Books:

Moe

Who has the best trade in town?
Who keeps the street from falling down?

(after each verse):
Moe-Moe-Moe-Moe
Moe-Moe-Moe-Moe


Who is the wisest bookstore sage?
Who gives more for books in trade?

Who is a friend who cares a lot?
Name a man who shares what he's got.

Who laughs at himself with all his heart?
Who speaks for the helpless person's part?

What's the best bookstore in the West?
Who keeps his place like a well-loved nest?
Thursday 30 December 1965 Robbie Basho  
Friday 31 December 1965 ED Denson plus others The Jabberwock's New Year Parties - avant-garde drama with ED Denson and the finest Berkeley folk artists.
Saturday 01 January 1966 ED Denson plus others The Jabberwock's New Year Parties - avant-garde drama with ED Denson and the finest Berkeley folk artists.
Sunday 02 January 1966 Hoot with Happenings  
Monday 03 January 1966 Closed  
Tuesday 04 January 1966 Joe McDonald  
Wednesday 05 January 1966 The Singers' Circle with Barry Olivier  
Thursday 06 January 1966 Robbie Basho  
Friday 07 January 1966 John Fahey  
Saturday 08 January 1966 John Fahey, Country Joe and the Fish (as the McDonald/Melton duo augmented by others to create the Instant Action Jug Band), Paul Krassner Articles in the Berkeley Barb refer to this event as the "Krazy Krassner Kaukus" where, on his return from Washington, Krassner delivers a State of the Union message for 1966 and introduce the Preseident's new cabinet members: Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Ronnie Davis and the Instant Jug Band. Paul Krassner is a “satirist,” rather in the style of Mort Sahl. Sahl would improvise commentary on events of the day, often using the same day’s newspaper (wild stuff for the 1950s), and presumably Krassner was a 60s version of Sahl.  Krassner would go on to be a founder of the Yippies.
The oblique reference to “The Instant Jug Band” is the only explicit reference to the Instant Action Jug Band that we have been able to uncover in 1966.  However, by January 1966 this would have been an early version of Country Joe and the Fish performing with McDonald, Melton, Barthol, Armstrong and perhaps one or two others.  By this point McDonald had replaced Basho in the adjacent apartment house and it appears that this may be a reference to a performance by the band, rather than the duo, Country Joe and the Fish in a reasonably stable form, albeit still colloquially the Instant Action Jug Band.
Sunday 09 January 1966 ED Denson (MC), "Crazy" Melton, Hanks McGrew, Robbie Basho, "Preacher" Paul Armstrong, Joe McDonald and others Folk Central Benefit
Monday 10 January 1966 Joe McDonald with Kelly Sistus, Moe Hirsch and other poets, actors and musicians [VDC Benefit] Although the first Country Joe and The Fish EP had been recorded and released, Country Joe McDonald was still better known as a local folksinger under his own name at this time. 
Tuesday 11 January 1966 Joe McDonald  
Wednesday 12 January 1966 The Singers' Circle with Barry Olivier  
Thursday 13 January 1966 Robbie Basho  
Friday 14 January 1966 Rosalie Sorrels  
Saturday 15 January 1966 Rosalie Sorrels  
Sunday 16 January 1966 Hoot with Happenings  
Monday 17 January 1966 Joe McDonald with poets, actors and musicians [VDC Benefit]  
Tuesday 18 January 1966 Sweets Mill Mountain Boys, Joe McDonald Sweets Mill Mountain Boys were Kenny Hall, Ron Hughey, Pete Everwine, and Frank Hicks.
Wednesday 19 January 1966 The Singers' Circle with Barry Olivier  
Thursday 20 January 1966 Robbie Basho  
Friday 21 January 1966 David Lindley David Lindley (misspelled Lindly on the January calendar as David Lindly) was the guitarist/violinist/banjoist/anything-with-strings-ist who went to form Kaleidoscope with Solomon Feldthouse. He became well known in the 70s accompanying Jackson Browne. For the current adventures of the unique Mr. Dave, investigate www.davidlindley.com.   Advertised as playing "harp-guitar, bowed banjo and fingerpicked fiddle".
Saturday 22 January 1966 David Lindley  
Sunday 23 January 1966 Hoot with Happenings  
Monday 24 January 1966 Joe McDonald with poets, actors and musicians [VDC Benefit]  
Tuesday 25 January 1966 Joe McDonald Advertised as "Author of the Vietnam Rag"
Wednesday 26 January 1966 The Singers' Circle with Barry Olivier  
Thursday 27 January 1966 Robbie Basho Delta Blues and Creole Dances
Friday 28 January 1966 David and Tina Meltzer David Meltzer was a poet and writer who was part of the younger generation of Beats, which made him a few years older than the hippies. He was also a singer and songwriter with his wife Tina, and they would form the group Serpent Power, which released two albums on Vanguard. 
Saturday 29 January 1966 David and Tina Meltzer "Bluegrass and Folk-Rock"
Sunday 30 January 1966 Hoot with Happenings Advertised as "The all time finest Hoot"
Monday 31 January 1966 "Congress of Wonders" by Open Theater, "Conversations from Jail" by Steve Weissman, Robbie Basho, Mike Rossman and Jerry Abrams, Joe McDonald [VDC Benefit] Mike Rossman was a member of the Free Speech Movement Steering Committee who carried the "Free Speech" banner with fellow Steering Committee member Ron Anastasi at the November 20, 1965 Peace March.  Mario Savio walked beside Rossman.  Jerry Abrams was to become an independent film maker, most notably producing the 1967 seven minute short “Be-In” which captured the spirit and essence of the San Francisco Human Be-In of January 14, 1967, but was strangely set to the music of Blue Cheer.  Later films included Eyetoon, Lotus Wing and Mainstream.  Within a year Abrams would form his psychedelic light show “Headlights” and be performing around Berkeley before moving over the bridge to the San Francisco Ballrooms. 
Tuesday 01 February 1966   Possibly the Loading Zone
Wednesday 02 February 1966 The Singers' Circle with Barry Olivier  
Thursday 03 February 1966 Robbie Basho  
Friday 04 February 1966 Lee Underwood, The Congress of Wonders (reading the Works of John Lennon and Allen Ginsberg) Esoteric Urban Blues.
Saturday 05 February 1966 Lee Underwood, The Congress of Wonders (reading the Works of John Lennon and Allen Ginsberg) The Congress of Wonders had been "imported at great expense from College Avenue".
Sunday 06 February 1966 Hoot  
Monday 07 February 1966 Escalators, Poetry readings by Mathew Zion, Thanasis Maskaleris, David Cole [VDC Benefit]  
Tuesday 08 February 1966 Country Joe and The Fish  
Wednesday 09 February 1966 Barry Olivier and the Singers Circle  
Thursday 10 February 1966 Robbie Basho  
Friday 11 February 1966 Dan Crary Dan Crary is a flatpicking guitarist.  Crary was at this time a Theology Student at the Golden Gate Seminary in San Francisco. He was already an accomplished steel-string guitarist, but since he was born in Kansas, he was largely self-taught. Ultimately, he went to another seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, and in the South he joined a bluegrass group called The Bluegrass Alliance. In 1970, Crary released what is considered to be the first bluegrass album featuring guitar as the lead instrument, the excellent Bluegrass Guitar on American Heritage Records (ultimately re-released on Sugar Hill and well worth getting).  Further distinguishing himself from the bohemian dropout world of folk music, Crary got his PhD and became a tenured Professor of Communications at Cal State Fullerton outside of Los Angeles.  He'd fit in his professional music career on weekends and during the summer. In subsequent years, acknowledgement of Crary’s talent grew well beyond bluegrass circles, and he released many fine albums. He recently retired from his academic career (after 30-something years) but fortunately has continued music full time.  He also played with Byron Berline & Sundance. 
Saturday 12 February 1966 Dan Crary The poster introduces this "superlative country musician from Oklahoma City" with a quotation from the Nashville Panjandumonium: "finest country guitar pickin' we've heard in a long time".
Sunday 13 February 1966 Hoot  
Monday 14 February 1966 Country Joe and the Fish [VDC Benefit] "VDC" refers to the Vietnam Day Committee, an anti-war organization.
Tuesday 15 February 1966 Country Joe and the Fish This may well have been just Joe McDonald and Barry Melton appearing as an acoustic duo.
Wednesday 16 February 1966 Barry Olivier and the Folk  
Thursday 17 February 1966 Robbie Basho  
Friday 18 February 1966 Sweets Mill Mountain Boys The flyer says "Old Time Country Band from Fresno".
Saturday 19 February 1966 Sweets Mill Mountain Boys  
Sunday 20 February 1966 Hoot: Frank Powell, Sandy Rothman, Jerry Foster, Phil Greenberg, Ken Spiker and (probably) Barry Melton A Campbell Coe photo has Rothman and Foster playing as a duo. The photo is dated February 20, 1966. There is also a photo of Frank Powell (an African-American playing solo guitar) that appears to be taken the same night.
Monday 21 February 1966 Matthew Zion, Thanasis Maskaleris and Loewin Sohn (all poetry readings), "Conversations from Jail" by Steve Weissman, Dan Paik, John Shine [VDC Benefit]  
Tuesday 22 February 1966 Country Joe and the Fish  
Wednesday 23 February 1966 The Singers' Circle with Barry Olivier Bill Ehlert and Bill Tolman busted for possession of pot.  They we arraigned and bail was reduced from $3300 to $1100.  Their lawyer wqas Peter Franck.
Thursday 24 February 1966 Robbie Basho, Reverend Gary Davis According to Phil Greenberg, the Reverend played an informal set at The Jabberwock at about 1:00 am the night before the Little Theater show. 
Friday 25 February 1966 Wry Catchers, Ale Ekstrum, Country Joe and the Fish, Paul Armstrong, Dan Paik. Unscheduled, Rev Gary Davis plays (drunk) at the Jabberwock Benefit to raise the $1100 bail for Bill Ehlert and Bill Tolman who were busted for possession of pot on February 23 and were being held at Santa Rita County Prison.  Unscheduled, Reverend Gary Davis plays (drunk on Seagram's 7 with peppermint candy) at the Jabberwock.  The Reverend Gary Davis had played earlier in the evening at the Little Theater, Berkeley (Florence Schwimly Little Theatre) in a show presented by "Brillig" - a front group for the Jabberwock. Whilst visiting Berkeley, the Reverend stayed with members of Country Joe and the Fish in Mrs Sherrill's adjacent apartment building on Russell Street.  Barry Melton recalls the visit of the good Reverend.  "In the early days of Country Joe and the Fish, me and most of other guys in the band lived next door to "The Jabberwock," a folk music nightclub in Berkeley. The club was owned by a big, friendly guy named Bill "Jolly Blue" Ehlert. The Jabberwock was only a postage-stamp sized place, so when Jolly Blue got an offer to do a Reverend Gary Davis show, he decided to promote it in the Berkeley Community Theatre. We were all in awe of "Rev" and it was decided that while he was in Berkeley, he would stay in our house. I remember he stayed there several days, as we sat about the kitchen playing music hour by hour. I think he'd played the "Ash Grove" down in L.A. and had dead time between playing there and playing in Berkeley--this was in late 1966 or early 1967.

And, by the way, Easy Ed's quote from Jerry Garcia expressing the belief that Rev had nothing to do with San Francisco psychedelia is stone wrong. The Rev DID participate in the psychedelic aspect of the San Francisco scene, at least to a limited degree while staying at our house.

Because I was the band's lead guitar player and--I believe--the guy in the band most in awe of Rev, I surrendered my room and bed for Rev to stay in. Things were fine for the first few days he was there: We'd wait for him to get up in the morning, cook him breakfast, take him on whatever errands he had to do, etc., and sit around, smoke, and play music all day and into the night. It was easy to forget that Rev was blind as we sat around the kitchen table, listening to his songs and stories hour after hour. Then the night of the big concert came and, as was the long-standing musical custom, the Rev was paid in cash at the conclusion of the gig. He brought me with him to collect the money and made me read off the denomination of each bill was it was counted into his hand, and I remember him stashing the larger portion of his money into the sound hole of his Gibson J-200, while leaving some travelling money rolled up in his pockets.

Well, the next morning I woke up and remember having to go into my room to get some clothes or something out of my chest of drawers. I was very quiet, as I could hear Rev snoring and didn't want to wake him. Well, I got whatever it was and I was headed toward the door when I heard in a commanding voice,"Don't move or you're dead!". I turned around to see Rev with a .38 revolver in his hand pointed in my general direction, but sort of moving around so as to cover a wider target area. I remember screaming something to the effect of, "No--don't shoot." Rev replied, "One wrong move and you're dead." Well, then I started talking a mile a minute..."Rev, it's me, it's Barry, don't shoot Rev...I was only getting something from my chest of drawers..." Finally, Rev said, "Is that you, Barry?" The incident was soon over, and I had escaped with me life. I guess, from his perspective, it must have been kind of weird to be alone, blind, on the road 3,000 miles from home and rooming with a bunch of lunatic young musicians many years his junior. But to this day, the picture of Reverend Gary Davis that sticks in my mind the most is early in the morning, half-awake and blind as a bat, with a .38 in his hand pointed in my general direction. It was one of the most frightening moments of my life. I'll never forget it."

 
Saturday 26 February 1966 Wry Catchers, Ale Ekstrum, Country Joe and the Fish, Paul Armstrong, Dan Paik Benefit, replacing the scheduled Hoot, to raise the $1100 bail for Bill Ehlert and Bill Tolman who were busted for possession of pot on February 23 and were being held at Santa Rita County Prison.  
Sunday 27 February 1966 Country Joe and the Fish, Paul Armstrong, Dan Paik and Others Benefit to raise the $1100 bail for Bill Ehlert and Bill Tolman who were busted for possession of pot on February 23 and were being held at Santa Rita County Prison.  
Monday 28 February 1966 Poetry Readings, Folk Music [VDC Benefit]  
Tuesday 01 March 1966 Dan Paik Advertised as Dan Paik sings "Inchon River Delta Blues".
Wednesday 02 March 1966 Dan Paik Paik, an ex UCB student, would later go on to manage the Jabberwock for a short time.
Thursday 03 March 1966 The Congress of Wonders reading from the works of Shakespeare, Lord Buckley, John Lennon, Allen Ginsberg  
Friday 04 March 1966 Country Joe and the Fish, Robbie Basho The poster says “A Magnificent Double Bill.”  Country Joe and The Fish are listed as “Rag Baby Recording Artists” and Basho as “hot new Takoma recording artist".   Future Country Joe and The Fish manager ED Denson was the principal of both labels.
Saturday 05 March 1966 Country Joe and the Fish, Robbie Basho, Larry Hanks  
Sunday 06 March 1966 Hoot with Larry Hanks and Jerusalem Slim, Paul Armstrong Paul Armstrong would record with Country Joe and The Fish in their initial electric incarnation that appeared on their self-released 1966 EP.  Armstrong lived, with other members of Country Joe and the Fish, in Mrs Sherrill's appartment house behind the Jabberwock.
Monday 07 March 1966 Closed  
Tuesday 08 March 1966 Párra Ó Síocháin Párra Ó Síocháin was a lutist and singer of traditional Irish songs.
Wednesday 09 March 1966 Párra Ó Síocháin  
Thursday 10 March 1966 Congress of Wonders reading from the great poets of the ages Congress of Wonders were a comedy/satire trio from Berkeley, initially from the UC Berkeley drama department and later part of Berkeley’s Open Theater on College Avenue, a prime spot for what were called “Happenings” (now ‘Performance Art’).  The group performed at the Avalon and other rock venues.  Ultimately a duo, Karl Truckload (Howard Kerr) and Winslow Thrill (Richard Rollins) created two Congress of Wonders albums on Fantasy, Revolting and Sophomoric.  Earl Pillow (actually Wesley Hind) was the original third member.  Reg E Williams has some photos of the Congress of Wonders at his web site.
Friday 11 March 1966 John Fahey ED Denson noted of this weekend that Fahey played before overflowing crowds at the 'Wock and the problems that had plagued earlier performances, like poor sound systems and drunkeness were overcome this time; and John seems to be feeling more at ease on stage.  He only spoke 5 words, and played well.
Saturday 12 March 1966 John Fahey  
Sunday 13 March 1966 Hoot, Lee Underwood Lee Underwood was a folk guitarist who went on to play with Tim Buckley.
Monday 14 March 1966 Closed  
Tuesday 15 March 1966 Blind Ebbets Field (Barry Melton) A solo appearance from "the world's formost Husdon River Delta Blues singer".
Wednesday 16 March 1966 Ron Chinn - flamenco Ron Chinn was a flamenco guitarist and notably, appeared with Los Flemencos de la Bodegas, who were regulars at the 40 Cedar Alley Coffeehouse in San Francisco.
Thursday 17 March 1966 Ron Chinn - flamenco  
Friday 18 March 1966 Skip James [see ED Denson story in Barb of March 25] Skip James, a legendary bluesman from the 30s and 40s, had recently been rediscovered by John Fahey.  His song “I’m So Glad” was made famous by Cream a few years later, and they opened their 2005 Albert Hall reunion playing it.   From ED Denson's column (The Folk Scene) in the March 25, 1966 issue of the Berkeley Barb:

Skip's first evening at the Jabberwock last weekend was grim.  He awoke Friday morning with no sensation in his left hand, and while he could still move it he was unable to feel which strings his fingers were on, as we discovered in the afternoon while taping an interview for KPFA.  For several painful hours he struggled in the studio with the guitar the Newport Folk Festival gave him, tuning and retuning, restringing and trying to believe the instrument was failing him.

When he returned to the house he played constantly until 8 p.m. when a hurried consultation with Jabberwock owner Bill Ehlert resulted in the decision that he should go on anyway.

As the evening progressed he began to regain feeling in his hand and his playing improved, but he still made many mistakes, despite his efforts to cover up by playing simple things, and his fine singing.  To make matters worse he Ehlert left the club, as he often does, during the second set and no one turned on the mike for the first two numbers of the third.  Ehlert was still gone when Skip came off, tense and worn by the ordeal, and no one knew if or when he would get paid.

 
Saturday 19 March 1966 Skip James, Pete Van Hook  ED Denson's review continues in the March 25, 1966 issue of the Berkeley Barb:

Saturday evening found his hand much improved, and he was altho venture into much of pyrotechnics which are his speciality.  He was still making several mistakes a song, but he was much happier and the room was lit by occasional flashes as the guitarists in the audience realized what was almost happening.  At the end of the second set he announced that Pete Van Hook ... was going to do a guest set.
 
Sunday 20 March 1966 Hoot with Paul Armstrong Paul Armstrong was a member of the Instant Action Jug Band and was the bass player for Country Joe and the Fish through July 1966. 
Monday 21 March 1966 Closed  
Tuesday 22 March 1966 Blind Ebbets Field (Barry Melton)  
Wednesday 23 March 1966 Robbie Basho The "Takoma Recording Great"
Thursday 24 March 1966 Robbie Basho  
Friday 25 March 1966 Jean Redpath Scots Ballad Sinder and Elektra Recording Artist.
Saturday 26 March 1966 Jean Redpath  
Sunday 27 March 1966 Hoot with John Fahey Benefit for Jabberwock Legal Defense Fund
Monday 28 March 1966 John Fahey  Benefit for Jabberwock Legal Defense Fund
Tuesday 29 March 1966 John Shine John Shine was a very good guitar player/singer who played for a while with Alice Stuart.  It is reported that he gave up playing.
Wednesday 30 March 1966 John Shine  
Thursday 31 March 1966 William Halperin, James Gibson Poetry (Haleperin) and Jazz (Gibson) accompanyment.
Friday 01 April 1966 Sweets Mill Mountain Boys "The Triumphant Return of the Sweets Mill Mountain Boys" from Fresno, CA.
Saturday 02 April 1966 Sweets Mill Mountain Boys  
Sunday 03 April 1966 Hoot with Jerusalem Slim MC "Jerusalem Slim" is almost certainly a Nom Du Folk for Larry Hanks.
Tuesday 05 April 1966 Larry Hanks sings "Woody Guthrie Songs and Ballads" Advertised as Hanks singing "Woody Guthrie Songs and Ballads".
Wednesday 06 April 1966 Larry Hanks sings "Woody Guthrie Songs and Ballads"  
Thursday 07 April 1966 Closed  
Friday 08 April 1966 David and Tina Meltzer, Dan Paik, Greg Lasser David Meltzer was primarily a Beat Poet, but he also played folk music.  He would end leading the group Serpent Power, who released a rock album in 1967 on Vanguard. He subsequently dropped his music career and focused on writing, and he has since published many works. Dan Paik was a sometime member of The Instant Action Jug Band, andplayed "folk-blues" as a solo artist.  Greg Lasser was a pedal steel guitar and banjo player who latterly worked on the maintenance and repair of the instruments. This show advertised "with the magnificent banjo of Greg Lasser (played by himself)".
Saturday 09 April 1966 David and Tina Meltzer, Dan Paik, Greg Lasser A quote from Rag Baby accompanied the advertising for David and Tina: "some of the most original music I have ever heard".
Sunday 10 April 1966 Hoot with Larry Hanks  
Monday 11 April 1966 Closed  
Tuesday 12 April 1966 Phil Greenberg, Phil Marsh A calendar for April and May 1966 survives, and it is headed “Folk Music Lives”.  The dates on the calendar exclude weekends.  The header suggests that folk is already being encroached by rock (the Fillmore has been open for two months, and the Avalon has just opened), but the absence of Friday and Saturday dates is curious.  It may be that weekend shows were advertised separately - and may not all have been folk shows - but it may also be that there were no performers on Friday and Saturday nights.  Phil Marsh was also a former member of The Instant Action Jug Band., and Phil Greenberg was also part of the same social crowd. Greenberg, at least, was a regular on “Hoot Night.” For their duo shows, Greenberg and Marsh would each do a solo set, and then do a set together. Greenberg still has a tape of two cuts from this solo performance, and the voices of Barry Melton, Bruce Barthol and ED Denson are plainly audible in the audience, demonstrating the friendly insularity of the scene.  This was also the first paid extravaganza by Phil and Phil at the 'Wock - with them each receiving $5. No records exist of what the money was spent on. Phil Greenberg would go on to play in England with Bruce Barthol as members of Formerly Fat Harry, who cut an album for Harvest and cut a one sided demo with Wizz Jones.  The demo eventually found a release via Nigel Cross's Shagrat label and can now be downloaded. As a side issue, Nigel also arranged for Hux to release an interesting selection of Formerly Fat Harry material from the group's own archive (Goodbye For Good) and released the marvelous Mariachi Riff Live on his own Shagrat label with extensive liner notes from the quiver of Colin Hill.
Wednesday 13 April 1966 Chris Selsor Playing "love ballads and heart songs". 
Thursday 14 April 1966 Chris Selsor  
Friday 15 April 1966 John Fahey Many of the out-of-town Folk Festival acts (only some of whom are listed here, from the promotional poster) probably played The Jabberwock around this time.
Saturday 16 April 1966 John Fahey  
Sunday 17 April 1966 Afternoon: Joe Tugwell and the Gospel Tonics; Sunday Night Hoot with "Long Lean" Larry Hanks as MC. The Sunday night hoots during April and May were advertised as "Berkeley's all-time all-universe finest Hoot with long lean Larry Hanks, MC".  Joe Tugwell & Gospel Tonics were a group on a mission - little is known although they did release a 45 on Divinity (Divinity 001) of "Lead Me to Calvery" b/w "Travelling Shoes".  The record was produced by Richard "Ricardo" Lewis, one of the pioneers of the Bay Area Latin jazz and salsa scene.
Monday 18 April 1966 Closed  
Tuesday 19 April 1966 Phil Greenberg, Phil Marsh [advertised as "Blues and Nonsense"] During one of the April 1966 Greenberg and Marsh shows, the Jolly Blue Giant made his singing debut on the Old Sow Song.  According to Jolly "unfortunately it didn't sell" and Jolly was forced to go back to his coffeehouse business.
Wednesday 20 April 1966 Ken Spiker  
Thursday 21 April 1966 Ken Spiker  
Friday 22 April 1966 Lee Underwood  
Saturday 23 April 1966 Lee Underwood  
Sunday 24 April 1966 Sunday Night Hoot with Larry Hanks  
Monday 25 April 1966 Closed  
Tuesday 26 April 1966 Lightnin’ Hopkins, Dan Paik Lightnin’ Hopkins, based in Houston, was a unique bluesman who had been recording since the 1950s. He largely improvised his material, and as a result recorded numerous albums without every repeating a song. At this time he was recording for Arhoolie Records and was well regarded on the folk scene.  He generally played with a bass player or drummer, usually hired locally for the gig.  There are numerous stories of superb musicians struggling to follow Lightnin’s freewheeling improvisations.
Wednesday 27 April 1966 Lightnin’ Hopkins, Dan Paik  
Thursday 28 April 1966 ED Denson, Phil Greenberg & Phil Marsh  ED Denson was one time road manager for Mississippi John Hurt and at this time managed musicians including Country Joe and the Fish and later the Joy of Cooking.  Additionally ED operated Takoma Records and started Rag Baby (with Joe).  It is probable that ED played harmonica, read poetry or provided some other spoken performance to live up to the billing of "Some Music but Mainly Madness".  
Friday 29 April 1966 Los Flamencos Del Valle, Saul (Solomon Feltdhouse) Advertised as "Surprise" Guest - which was Solomon Feldthouse appearing under his nom de folk as Saul.
Saturday 30 April 1966 Los Flamencos Del Valle, Saul (Solomon Feltdhouse) The poster advises an appearance of "The Incomparable Saul".
Sunday 01 May 1966 [3pm] The Unidentified Flying Object (Notes From The Underground); [9pm] Sunday Night Hoot with Larry Hanks There is a somewhat contentious position that the Notes From The Underground were advertised as, although never called, the Unidentified Flying Object.  There is raft of evidence to substantiate this and a slightly smaller raft (a canoe of evidence if you will) suggesting a different unspecific solution.  If this were not enough, I also now claim that the Notes From The Underground were also advertised as “Oedipus and the Mothers” for the three-day Jabberwock Rent Party in mid May.  The poster advertising the rent party has a number of nom de folks - Filippe Villaverde, Blind Ebbets Field, Berkeley Fuzz and the Hedd Busters, Saul etc. and I am in no doubt that Oedipus and the Mothers is another.  Having contacted a member of the similarly named garage band from Texas I can confirm they had no involvement.  Considering also that date wise this is spot on for the Sunday afternoon shows by the Notes From The Underground (UFOs) I have concluded that Oedipus and the Mothers, the Unidentified Flying Object and the Notes are one of the same.
Monday 02 May 1966 Benefit for Bob Scheer Bob Scheer was a one time City Lights book store employee and an editor at the left-leaning magazine Ramparts.  Benefits were held for him in his quest to stand for Congress on an anti-war and anti-poverty stance - to be fair, still valid reasons to stand today.  Scheer later became a journalist for Playboy and the Los Angeles Times.
Tuesday 03 May 1966 Robbie Basho Advertised as "Guitarist of the Other Shore". 
Wednesday 04 May 1966 Robbie Basho  
Thursday 05 May 1966 ED Denson, Phil Greenberg & Phil Marsh  
Friday 06 May 1966 James Wilkins James Wilkins was a Portland based guitarist.  This session was recorded for Takoma Records but remains unreleased.
Saturday 07 May 1966 James Wilkins ED "Folk Scene" Denson is quoted on the poster as saying "a brilliantly original guitarist … should not be missed".
Sunday 08 May 1966 [3pm] The Unidentified Flying Object (Notes From The Underground); [9pm] Sunday Night Hoot with Larry Hanks  
Monday 09 May 1966 Gamut Theater's "Scenes From Pfiffer's Ironic", Ken Spiker (folk), The Aztecs (rock) and Lee Skipper Jazz Quintet Peace Night and Benefit for Bob Scheer
Tuesday 10 May 1966 Congress of Wonders [readings from Lennon and Lord Buckley] "Total Humor" with readings from Lennon and Lord Buckley
Wednesday 11 May 1966 Parra O’Siochain - singer and lutist  Singer and lutist
Thursday 12 May 1966 Parra O’Siochain  
Friday 13 May 1966 Babe Stovall - Mississippi blues Jewell "Babe" Stovall was born on October 4, 1907 in Mississippi.  He played acoustic Mississippi blues and has been cited as a musical influence by a number of musicians, not least Jerry Jeff Walker who reportedly travelled with and learned from Stovall. He died September 21, 1974.  Jerry Jeff Walker was to appear at the 'Wock with his band Circus Maximus and Stovall was to be penned in to history as Walker's "Mr Bojangles"..
Saturday 14 May 1966 Babe Stovall - Mississippi blues The poster describes the show as "breakdown and blues" and quotes the Broadside of Boston: "an odd mixture of bluesman and songster …plays with an infectious rhthym … It is my unqualified wish that you go see and hear him". 
Sunday 15 May 1966 [3pm] The Unidentified Flying Object (Notes From The Underground); [9pm] Sunday Night Hoot with Larry Hanks  
Monday 16 May 1966 Folk Benefit for Bob Scheer  
Tuesday 17 May 1966 Congress of Wonders, Country Joe and the Fish, plus assorted others - see the notes for Thursday 19th [Pay the Rent Benefit] On this day Bill Ehlert passed a lie detector test and charges of possession of marijuana were dropped the following day.  The charges arose from a "bust" on February 23 - Bill never got back his tin of oregano.
Wednesday 18 May 1966 Country Joe and the Fish, David Cohen, plus assorted others - see the notes for Thursday 19th [Pay the Rent Benefit] Country Joe and Barry Melton had seen The Butterfield Blues Band in March at the Fillmore (along with the rest of hip San Francisco) and were determined to form an electric band. They had put together a group of musicians they knew from the Instant Action Jug Band. Joe and Barry sang and played guitars (Barry played the leads), Bruce Barthol and John Paul Armstrong (hitherto a Hoot host) alternated on guitar and bass and John Francis Gunning played drums and percussion.  Melton knew that his friend, New Yorker David Cohen, played piano (although Cohen was mainly a guitarist), so in typical 60’s style Cohen was invited to join the group as organist.  David (Bennett) Cohen was also booked to play a solo "blues, rag and rock" show, even though he was in Country Joe and The Fish.
Thursday 19 May 1966 Berkeley Fuzz and the Hedd Busters (Country Joe and the Fish), David Cohen, plus assorted others [Pay the Rent Benefit] Country Joe and The Fish headline under a different name, a nom de folk if you will.  And this is one of a number that appear on the poster advertising the non-stop May 17 to 19 “Rent Party” lists a number of folk who were, shall we say, expected to turn up and play.  I doubt we will ever definitively figure out who actually played and when. Following on from my contentious position over the Notes From The Underground being advertised as, although never called, the Unidentified Flying Objects for their Sunday afternoon shows, I will start with them.  Likely contenders for appearing at some point during this three day window are Oedipus & The Mothers (undoubtedly, in my mind at least, the Note From the Underground), Berkeley Fuzz & the Hedd Busters (Country Joe and the Fish), The Open Theater, “Dynamite Annie” Johnson, The Congress of Wonders, Lloyd Williams & Mike Skoda (I have yet to figure this one out – if Miles Skoda is not a nom de folk it should be), Moe Hirsch, Elba Faust (Ellen Faust Brandywine and later Shekhinah Mountainwater), Ken Spiker, John Adams, Dan Paik, Saul (Solomon Feldthouse), Blind Ebbetts Field (Barry Melton), Perry lederman, Frank Powell, Robbie Basho, Larry Hanks, David Cohen, Phil Marsh and Filippe Villacerde (Phil Greenberg). 
Friday 20 May 1966 Solomon Feldthouse, Rosalie Sorrels  Solomon Feldthouse was the multi-instrumentalist who was a principal founder of the fabulously eclectic Los Angeles group Kaleidoscope. Rosalie Sorrels was billed as a “Utah Ballad Singer.”
Saturday 21 May 1966 Dan Crary, Rosalie Sorrels Crary is described on the poster as a "Country Guitar Picker".  
Sunday 22 May 1966 [3pm] The Unidentified Flying Object (Notes From The Underground); [9pm] SSunday Night Hoot with Larry Hanks ("Prehistoric Garbage Music") Billed as “Prehistoric Garbage Music.”
Monday 23 May 1966 Peace Night and Folk Benefit for Bob Scheer: Malvina Reynolds, Grant Houston, Ron Smith Quartet, Putting Forth Peace Night and Folk Benefit for Bob Scheer.
Tuesday 24 May 1966 Clarence Van Hook  
Wednesday 25 May 1966 Clarence Van Hook  
Thursday 26 May 1966 Folk Night  
Friday 27 May 1966 John Fahey  
Saturday 28 May 1966 Benefit for Scheer Art Auction (afternoon); John Fahey (evening) A Benefit for Scheer Art Auction took place during the afternoon.
Sunday 29 May 1966 [3pm] The Unidentified Flying Object (Notes From The Underground); [9pm] Sunday Night Hoot with Larry Hanks  
Monday 30 May 1966 Closed  
Tuesday 31 May 1966 Solomon Feldthouse  
Wednesday 01 June 1966 Dan Paik Blues and Originalia.
Thursday 02 June 1966 Country Joe and the Fish One member of Country Joe and the Fish was attacked by a drunken marine at the Jabberwock (reports ED Denson in the Berkeley Barb).
Friday 03 June 1966 Perry Lederman This is the night that twenty year old aspiring musician and photographer Jef Jaisun first walks in to the Jabberwock.  It was 1:45 am and Perry Lederman is playing a guest set which consists of a half-hour raga like piece on electric guitar.  Lederman, though little known now, was widely regarded by local musicians at the time. He was a solo guitarist somewhat in the John Fahey mode, but more influenced by Indian music.  His only known recording was on an Arhoolie sampler.  He was also a seeker-out of vintage 3/4-size Martin guitars, which he continued to favour throughout his life.  Lederman died at the age of 52 in 1995.  On June 3, 1966, twenty year old aspiring musician and photographer Jef Jaisun walked in to The Jabberwock for the first time.  Jaisun will become immortal in the Bay Area for producing the much-played and fondly remembered record “Friendly Neighborhood Narco Agent”.  This record, independently released as a 33 RPM EP by Jaisun in 1969, was later picked up Dr Demento, and the song reached an audience outside the Bay Area.  Click see http://www.eljefe.net/fnnafaq.html for the hilarious and unbelievable story of this song. Jef recalls "The entire package was patterned after Country Joe's Rag Baby EPs, right down to using Sierra Sound as the recording studio. I figured if it worked for him, well... not to mention that people in the Bay Area, and Berkeley in particular, had become accustomed to that type of EP packaging, thanks mostly to Joe. Several other folkies released similar EPs about the same time". 
Saturday 04 June 1966 Perry Lederman  
Sunday 05 June 1966 Sunday Night Hoot  
Monday 06 June 1966 Closed  
Tuesday 07 June 1966 Solomon Feldthouse  
Wednesday 08 June 1966 Dan Paik  
Thursday 09 June 1966 Country Joe and the Fish  
Friday 10 June 1966 Kid Future (Stefan Grossman) Kid Future was the alter ego of Stefan Grossman that he had used to record a number of cuts for Joe Bussard's Frederick, Maryland based Fonotone Records.   Stefan Grossman grew up in New York City, where he was fortunate enough to get guitar lessons from Reverend Gary Davis and other recently rediscovered bluesmen. As a result, Grossman became a master of different blues guitar styles at an early age. He had been in the ad hoc Even Dozen Jug Band (featuring David Grisman, John Sebastian and numerous other aspiring young folkies), who had released an album in 1964. Grossman moved to California around 1966. At one point, right around the time of this show, there was an effort (according to Richie Unterburger, and confirmed elsewhere) by Elektra’s Paul Rothchild to put together a folk rock group (like The Mamas and Papas) with Grossman, Taj Mahal, guitarist Steve Mann and a recently returned folk singer from Texas named Janis Joplin. They actually had a rehearsal in Berkeley, sometime in June (Janis’s first show with Big Brother was at the Avalon June 10, 1966, but she had been in the Bay Area for about 10 days). However, Janis would not abandon Big Brother and the deal was scuttled. Grossman moved to England around 1967, and worked with many well-known British musicians, releasing a number of albums. He returned to the United States in 1980, and he is particularly well-known for his instructional guitar videos. Grossman played on Pat Kilroy's Light of Day album released in 1966.
Saturday 11 June 1966 Paul Arnoldi, Kid Future (Stefan Grossman) Paul Arnoldi, originally from the Wyoming prairies, initially came to the fore as a Cambridge folksinger and one time member of the The Charles River Valley Boys.  Paul moved to Berkeley in fall 1962 (to get a graduate degree in architecture), and oscillated between Cambridge and Berkeley for the next several years, before stints in New York and Los Angeles.  Paul was a regular on the Bay Area music scene in the mid 1960s, appearing at many of the Berkeley venues and across the Bay in San Francisco at venues as diverse as the Straight Theater and the Cedar Alley Coffee House performing his "prairie-influenced-east coast-urban-folk style of traditional and original material".  Paul continues to record and perform to this day.

The poster advertising the Kid Future show (pack up your troubles in your old kit bag) lists Stefan Grossman as also appearing.
Sunday 12 June 1966 Sunday Night Hoot  
Monday 13 June 1966 Ramblin’ Jack Elliott Ramblin Jack Elliott’s biography reads like bad fiction. Born Eliot Adnopoz in Brooklyn in 1931, he ran away to join the rodeo at age 14. He eventually returned to Brooklyn to finish high school . In the early 1950s he met Woody Guthrie, and rambled around with him, becoming a folksinger in the process. In the mid-1950s he moved to England and played a significant role in the Skiffle boom. In the later 50s, he returned to America, and met Bob Dylan in 1961. Dylan took the power of Guthrie’s songs and the indirectness of Elliott’s indescribable Brooklyn Cowboy persona and infused it with his own brilliant songwriting, and the Bob Dylan we know now was born. The rest of Elliott’s life and achievements is equally interesting, but too lengthy to detail here.  A remarkable performer, Elliott generally talks more than he sings, in a strange hypnotic way that does not translate well on the printed page, or even on record. In person, he is strangely gripping, leaving the listener surprised at how time has passed so quickly and how difficult it is to recount the story that was told.
Tuesday 14 June 1966 Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, Solomon Feldthouse  
Wednesday 15 June 1966 Dan Paik   
Thursday 16 June 1966 Country Joe and the Fish  
Friday 17 June 1966 John Adams, Los Flamencos De La Valle Los Flamencos De La Valle are likely to have been singer Tom Sporcic with Phil Greenberg on guitar.  Phil recalls a couple of flamenco shows he played at the Jabberwock with Tom Sporcic. 
Saturday 18 June 1966 John Adams, Los Flamencos De La Valle  
Sunday 19 June 1966 Sunday Night Hoot  
Monday 20 June 1966 John Fahey  
Tuesday 21 June 1966 Solomon Feldthouse  
Wednesday 22 June 1966 Dan Paik  
Thursday 23 June 1966 Country Joe and the Fish  
Friday 24 June 1966 Kathy and Carol Kathy Larisch and Carol McComb were a folk duo who had been singing together since they were in high school together in Vista, CA (North of San Diego).  Their big break came at the 1964 Berkeley Folk Festival, when Joan Baez (whom they had previously met) saw them play at the Campus  coffee shop (The Bear’s Lair) and got them on to the Festival bill. They were signed to Elektra and put out an obscure but well regarded album called Kathy and Carol in 1965 (re-released in 1995 as a cd on Collector’s Choice, with fine liner notes by Richie Unterberger).  Kathy and Carol were working on a more contemporary folk-rock sound in 1966, but Elektra apparently lost interest and they were dropped from the label.  This show was advertised as "Ballads Sing in Close Harmony".
 
Saturday 25 June 1966 Kathy and Carol Carol McComb remains a professional musician (see www.CarolMccomb.com) and Kathy Larisch returned to school and ultimately became a faculty member at Oakland’s California College of Arts and Crafts, though she and Carol have sung together informally on occasion.
Sunday 26 June 1966 Hoot with John Adams  
Monday 27 June 1966 Closed  
Tuesday 28 June 1966 Solomon Feldthouse  
Wednesday 29 June 1966 Dan Paik  
Thursday 30 June 1966 Closed The Jabberwock was closed, probably due to the 9th Annual Berkeley Folk Festival being in full swing.  At the Bear's Lair Country Joe & The Fish appeared as part of the cabaret. It is entirely possible that the Jabberwock was opened much later for regulars with Country Joe and the Fish putting in an impromptu appearance.
Friday 01 July 1966 Country Joe and the Fish In June 1966 "Rag Baby" EP #2 is released, featuring Country Joe and The Fish performing "Section 43", "Love" and "Bass Strings", recorded June 6, 1966 at Sierra Sound in Berkeley. Soon afterwards, Paul Armstrong leaves the group in order to fulfil his Conscientious Objector obligations (he drives a hospital truck).  Bruce Barthol moves permanently to bass.
Saturday 02 July 1966 Stefan Grossman  
Sunday 03 July 1966 Hoot with John Adams  
Monday 04 July 1966 Closed  
Tuesday 05 July 1966 Ramblin’ Jack Elliott "Folk, Country and Oldtime Music"
Wednesday 06 July 1966 Ramblin’ Jack Elliott  
Thursday 07 July 1966 Ramblin’ Jack Elliott  
Friday 08 July 1966 Kid Future  Advertised as "Kid Future Rides Again".  The origin of the name “Kid Future” go back in the 1930s where there were a number of country blues artists called Willie Brown, the most well known of these was friends with Son House and recorded a song called Future Blues, using an open G tuning. This song was considered to be very difficult to master and puzzled many experienced blues players but Stefan Grossman, when still in his teens, figured out how to play it.  Grossman moved in the same circles as John Fahey and was friends with Fonotone records owner Joe Bussard. Given Bussard's penchant for creating noms de plume, as he did famously for John Fahey when recording him as Blind Thomas in the 1950s, it seems most likely that the origins of the name “Kid Future” lie in Frederick, MD.  
Saturday 09 July 1966 Kid Future   
Sunday 10 July 1966 Hoot with John Adams  
Monday 11 July 1966 Closed  
Tuesday 12 July 1966 Ramblin’ Jack Elliott  
Wednesday 13 July 1966 Ramblin’ Jack Elliott  
Thursday 14 July 1966 Ramblin’ Jack Elliott  
Friday 15 July 1966 Mark Spoelstra  
Saturday 16 July 1966 Mark Spoelstra  
Sunday 17 July 1966 Hoot with Larry Hanks  
Monday 18 July 1966 Closed  
Tuesday 19 July 1966 Pine Valley Boys, Solomon Feldthouse  
Wednesday 20 July 1966 Dan Paik  
Thursday 21 July 1966 Country Joe and the Fish  
Friday 22 July 1966 Robert Pete Williams Robert Pete Williams was "discovered" in the notorious Angola State Penitentiary in Louisiana by folklorist Harry Oster, who made recordings of Williams in 1959 and 1960. These remarkable recordings were released as records by the Louisiana Folklore Society (and later re-released on Arhoolie Records). When Williams was pardoned, he became a performer on the folk blues circuit, although he was apparently not entirely comfortable with being a performer. Williams, from Baton Rouge and born in 1914, was conversant in the blues styles of the time, having learned most of them from contemporary records. However, in the 1940s he changed his music to a style closer to the field hollers of the old South, and improvised lyrics without bothering to use rhyming couplets. His dark, brooding stories of unhappiness were blues of another order altogether, and although a remarkable talent he never reached a wider popularity. He continued to record until his death in 1980. Williams appeared to be pardoned in the early 1960s and recorded for various labels. In 1966 he made an album for ED Denson’s Takoma Records, called Louisiana Blues.
Saturday 23 July 1966 Robert Pete Williams  
Sunday 24 July 1966 Hoot with Larry Hanks  
Monday 25 July 1966 Closed  
Tuesday 26 July 1966 Pine Valley Boys The Pine Valley Boys were one of the earliest bluegrass bands from Berkeley (although The Redwood Canyon Ramblers were definitely the first, in 1959).  The group was formed in mid-1963 by Butch Waller (mandolin) and Herb Pedersen (banjo), both recent graduates of St. Mary’s High in Berkeley.  They moved to Los Angeles in late 1963, and spent nine months trying to “make it”, even going on a tour of colleges in the South called Hootenanny 1963.  In Los Angeles they met violinist Richard Greene, who played with the group periodically.  By mid-1964, the group returned to Berkeley.  David Nelson, then attending Oakland California College of Arts and Crafts, joined the group (replacing Rich Conley on guitar), as well as Geoff Levin (replacing Dale Hollis on bass).  Richard Greene would sometimes fly up to play with the group.  However, by early 1966 the group had disintegrated.  Pedersen had gone on to play with local bluegrass stalwarts Vern and Ray, (Vern Williams and Ray Park) and Nelson was forming the New Delhi River Band in the Palo Alto area. The date of this performance suggests that this was a one-off performance by some combination of the group, all of whose members (current and former) were still based in the Bay Area.
Wednesday 27 July 1966 Solomon Feldthouse  
Thursday 28 July 1966 Country Joe and the Fish On July 29 (Friday), Country Joe and The Fish also played a benefit in San Francisco (the Reaktion Harvest at Geary Street Temple with Jazz Mice Septet, Perry Lederman, Cyrus Koch and Jamar Colt Jazz Combo).  Two performances in one night was not uncommon in the days when bands had considerably less equipment.
Friday 29 July 1966 Country Joe and the Fish  
Saturday 30 July 1966 Country Joe and the Fish  
Sunday 31 July 1966 Hoot with Larry Hanks  
Monday 01 August 1966 Closed  
Tuesday 02 August 1966 Pine Valley Boys, "Huge Mysterie Attraction"  
Wednesday 03 August 1966 The New Age Advertised as a "Huge Mysterie Attraction".
Thursday 04 August 1966 The New Age Advertised as a "Huge Mysterie Attraction".
Friday 05 August 1966 Steve Mann, Susan Derby Steve Mann, by 1966 a successful LA session musician, had been widely regarded in the early 60s by local guitarists. Mann, reputedly a phenomenal guitarist, was an old pal of Jorma Kaukonen’s and gave him the nickname of Blind Lemon Jefferson Airplane, which caused Jorma to suggest it on a whim years later when his band was looking for a name.  Mann had grown up in North Hollywood, but had moved to the Bay Area for a few years in the early 60s, and then had returned to Los Angles.  Mann was also reputedly the subject of the Hoyt Axton song “Snowblind Friend.”  The Hot Tuna song Mann’s Fate was a tribute to his guitar style. Mann had many difficulties with drugs and his health.  He had a significant breakdown and dropped from sight late in 1967.  Due in part to some confusing liner notes on another musician’s album, it appeared that Mann was dead, and since he never performed or recorded, it was difficult to prove otherwise.  Happily, in fact, he did survive, and after many tribulations and much help from his friends, he is back in Berkeley and performs and records on occasion. For a better view of the peculiar and remarkable career of Steve Mann, see here.

In the same way as Barry Melton, guitarist with Country Joe and the Fish, adopted the alter-ego "Blind Ebbets Field", Steve Mann was known to use the name "Little Son Goldfarb".
Saturday 06 August 1966 Steve Mann, Susan Derby  
Sunday 07 August 1966 Hoot with Larry Hanks  
Tuesday 09 August 1966 Spider John Koerner Spider John Koerner, born in Rochester, NY in 1938, had gone to the University of Minnesota in 1956.  He was an accomplished folk musician by 1958 standards when he met Freshman Bob Dylan. Koerner moved to Greenwich Village in 1962, and he formed a trio called Koerner, Ray and Glover.  Their 1962 album on Elektra was one of the key albums of the early folk scene, teaching blues and ragtime songs to aspiring folk musicians everywhere.

Koerner went on to have a long career with Koerner, Ray and Glover and by himself.  His website, with many valuable links, is at http://www.mwt.net/~koerner/index.html. Dave Ray died in his sleep in 2002.
Wednesday 10 August 1966 Spider John Koerner  
Thursday 11 August 1966 Spider John Koerner, "Huge Mysterie Attraction"  
Friday 12 August 1966 Carmen Christina Singing, by all accounts, folk songs of old Mexico.
Saturday 13 August 1966 Carmen Christina  
Friday 19 August 1966 Perry Lederman  
Saturday 20 August 1966 Perry Lederman  
Sunday 21 August 1966 Hoot  
Monday 22 August 1966 Romuto performs poetry of love and revolution by Cummings, Yevtushenko, Ferlinghetti, Pervert, Dylan Thomas  
Tuesday 23 August 1966 The New Age The New Age were a Berkeley folk trio featuring Pat Kilroy on guitar, flautist Susan Graubard and Jeffrey Stewart on congas, who had replaced tabla player Bob Amacker.  This was the line-up that also played at the Human Be-In (Country Joe appearing on stage with them) on January 14, 1967 and were described in an advertisement in the Oracle as playing "way out Indian-type stuff".  Pat Kilroy had released a very obscure album on Elektra solo album, Light of Day, on Elektra in 1966, although the album was in reality by The New Age (with Amacker rather than Stewart).  Light of Day (Elektra Records EKS 7311, released late 1966), although obscure at the time and never released on CD, has obtained the status of a genuine cult recording.  It anticipated “New Age Music” by some decades, and is a hard-to-describe mélange of folk, blues, Indian and “psychedelic” acoustic music. Kilroy died on Christmas Day 1967, insuring his status as a cult figure, but he is well-remembered by his peers and well regarded by those who have heard his album. The album was finally re-released on CD in 2007, and writer David Biasotti wrote the definitive article on Kilroy and The New Age for Ugly Things Magazine (issue 25).

Country Joe wrote Susan for Susan Graubard, flautist with the New Age.  Susan's work can also be found on Robbie Basho's album The Falconer's Arm (1967) and on Habibiyya - If Man But Knew, with the remnants of the wonderful Mighty Baby (Roger Powell, Ian Whitman and Michael Evans).
 
Wednesday 24 August 1966 The New Age  
Thursday 25 August 1966 The New Age  
Friday 26 August 1966 Mark Spoelstra This was advertised as Mark's "Last West Coast apprearance before touring Britain". He did indeed end up in the UK around the New Year.
Saturday 27 August 1966 Mark Spoelstra  
Sunday 28 August 1966 Mark Spoelstra, Country Joe and The Fish  
Monday 29 August 1966 Country Joe and The Fish, Dan Paik, Don Garrett, Blue House Basement  Peace Activist Defense Fund Benefit.  "The Blue House" was a large Victorian rooming house on 1915 Oak Street, across from the Panhandle. The Blue House Basement (not surprisingly) formed in the basement of the house.  Lead singer Warren Phillips later fronted Mount Rushmore before joining fellow Blue House Basement member Stan Muther in Phoenix, with Jabberwock regular Jef Jaisun.
Tuesday 30 August 1966 Country Joe and The Fish Country Joe and The Fish are now beginning to break into the San Francisco ballrooms. Their first appearance at the Fillmore was on August 27, 1966, filling in for the 13th Floor Elevators (who were blocked contractually from playing), and it is the first of many shows. The group rehearses almost daily at The Jabberwock, and as a result plays the club regularly as well. In the previous month Melton and McDonald had hitchhiked to New York City to drum up interest amongst record companies. Club manager Bill Ehlert lets a number of local itinerant musicians (among them Jef Jaisun) sleep at the Jabberwock, in return for which they do a certain amount of cooking and cleaning at the club. In the spirit of the times, they don’t accept payment (not that the club has much to spare). With the Fish rehearsing and a number of musicians (somewhat) living on the premises, the Jabberwock becomes sort of a Berkeley after hours club. Bars in California must close at 2 am, and Berkeley has always closed up early, so various musicians just end up staying in the Jabberwock all night. On at least one occasion, a particularly wild event leads all the revellers to raid the refrigerator, consuming much of the club’s meagre profits.
Wednesday 31 August 1966 Country Joe and The Fish  
Thursday 01 September 1966 Country Joe and The Fish  
Friday 02 September 1966 Country Joe and The Fish, Mark Spoelstra ED Denson reported in the Berkeley Barb:

Berkeley's own Country Joe & the Fish after a vacation, with their material rearranged, have opened at the Jabberwock, quite naturally.  They are on the verge of going professional.  By the way, this time next month I may not say quite naturally the Jabberwock when I mention rock in Berkeley since this Barbie has heard from people who are opening two additional clubs, and perhaps a dance.  If any of it happens, it will be quite pleasant.

Country Joe and the Fish had taken much of August as vacation.  There are no recorded shows after August 5 until they appear at the Fillmore on August 27 - their first Fillmore appearance, filling in for the 13th Floor Elevators.  I am assuming that ED wrote his article prior to August 27 as this would have been noteworthy.  This also leads me to believe that one of the clubs ED refers to is the New Orleans House, which opened on August 26, 1966.
 
Saturday 03 September 1966 Country Joe and The Fish  
Monday 05 September 1966 Sharon Lee, SF Mime Troupe doing scenes from "A Minstral Show" [Alexander Defense Committee (ADC) Benefit] The San Francisco Mime Troupe, founded in 1959, began putting on (spoken) political theater performances in public parks in San Francisco in 1962. They had since metamorphosed into a touring company with a significant voice in the political underground. Among the many alumni of the Mime Troupe were featured players Emmett Grogan, Peter Coyote and Luis Valdez, and of course the very first Bill Graham-produced rock concert was the benefit for the Mime Troupe held on November 6, 1965, as Graham was the Mime Troupe’s business manager at the time. The Mime Troupe is still going strong and, since 1976, the Troupe’s musical director has been former Instant Action Jug Band (and Country Joe and The Fish) member Bruce Barthol.

The 9PM show was put on in support of the Alexander Defense Committee as part of the South Africa: The Anatomy of Apartheid awareness activities that were on-going at the time.  In addition to Jabberwock shows, South African freedom fighter Franz John Tennyson "Fransie" Lee spoke at Le Conte School on September 6 and the Buchanan Street Y in San Francisco on September 7.  No doubt he would have been at the Jabberwock on September 5.  Some interesting names crop up in the list of co-sponsors provided on the poster, including Mario Savio, Robert Scheer, Ralph J Gleason and one Assemblyman Willie Brown.
 
Tuesday 06 September 1966 Robbie Basho, Jon Adams The poster states about Jon Adams: "Known from Fresno to Sacramento, this superlative psong psinger at last plays Berkeley".
Wednesday 07 September 1966 Robbie Basho, Jon Adams The poster notes that "Berkeley's favorite sun returns from the decadent east (coast)".
Thursday 08 September 1966 Robbie Basho, Jon Adams  
Friday 09 September 1966 The Wrycatchers, The Line (from LA and featuring Solomon Feldthouse) The Line were from Los Angeles and featured Solomon Feldthouse.
Saturday 10 September 1966 The Wrycatchers, The Line (from LA and featuring Solomon Feldthouse)  
Sunday 11 September 1966 Mike Lamb & Will Scarlett Lamb and Scarlett had debuted at 1090 Page Street on September 1 with Lamb on guitar and Scarlett on harp.
Monday 12 September 1966 Benefit for The Berkeley Barb  
Tuesday 13 September 1966 Quicksilver Messenger Service The Quicksilver Messenger Service are already headliners on weekends at The Fillmore and The Avalon, but they play midweek gigs at clubs like The Jabberwock. In 1966, bands who played the Fillmore (including the Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane and Quicksilver) identified themselves as "Folk-Rock" groups. Certainly, the set lists of all these groups featured many folk club standards, if re-arranged for electric bands. Thus the appearance of rock groups in a folk club was not as far-fetched as it seems from this distance.
Wednesday 14 September 1966 Quicksilver Messenger Service  
Thursday 15 September 1966 Quicksilver Messenger Service  
Friday 16 September 1966 Quicksilver Messenger Service  
Saturday 17 September 1966 The New Age On the evening of September 17, seventeen year old Oakland girl Cheryl Nolan was murdered in her car on Eton Avenue near Woolsey Street.  Miss Nolan had told her widowed mother, Adela, that she was planning to meet a friend at the Jabberwock Club at 2901 Telegraph Avenue. However, according to Lieutenant Darrel Hickman, no one recalls her having entered the club any time during the evening.
Sunday 18 September 1966 The New Age  
Monday 19 September 1966 Lomuto [Poetry Reading]  
Tuesday 20 September 1966 Blackburn and Snow Guitarist Jeff Blackburn and singer Sherry Snow had been folksingers around 1964 in a scene that centred upon San Jose State College. That scene also included Paul Kantner, Jorma Kaukonen, David Frieberg (the Quicksilver bassist) and a number of others. By the time of their first appearance at the Jabberwock in September 1966, Blackburn and Snow were signed to the Kingston Trio’s management (Frank Werber and Trident Productions) and recording an album, albeit only two singles were released at the time. They played as a folk-rock duo, usually with a pick-up band of local friends. Gary "Chicken" Hirsch, soon to replace John Francis Gunning in Country Joe and The Fish, was probably the drummer at the time of the Jabberwock shows. David Bennett Cohen had been the lead guitarist in an earlier line up. Blackburn & Snow spent three years playing the Bay Area ballrooms and clubs including the Fillmore, the Avalon and the Ark, as well as a number of shows in the parks.  Many years later, Blackburn ended up working in an occasional bar band in Santa Cruz with Neil Young, which is how he came to co-write Young’s song "My My Hey Hey".

A few months after Blackburn & Snow disbanded in 1967, Dan Hicks, founder and lead singer of Dan Hicks and His Hot Licks, advertised for two women singers to join his band. Sherry and her friend, Christina, auditioned. They began singing with Dan and soon recorded the first Hot Licks album, Original Recordings, in 1968.  Since then, Sherry, now called Halimah, has lived for a long time in the UK and has traveled extensively.
For the past fourteen years Halimah has been the programmer/host of the weekly World Music program "Ethnic Excursions" on KHSU-FM in Arcata, Ca. as Halimah the Dreamah. 
Wednesday 21 September 1966 Blackburn and Snow  
Thursday 22 September 1966 Blackburn and Snow  
Friday 23 September 1966 Kid Future, Steve Mann  
Sunday 25 September 1966 Hoot  
Monday 26 September 1966 John Teyford [Poetry Reading]  
Wednesday 28 September 1966 SF Mime Troupe  
Thursday 29 September 1966 SF Mime Troupe  
Friday 30 September 1966 SF Mime Troupe  
Saturday 01 October 1966 SF Mime Troupe  
Sunday 02 October 1966 SF Mime Troupe (afternoon); Sunday Hoot Night, Country Joe and The Fish ED Denson's column (The Folk Scene) in the Berkeley Barb of September 30, 1966 (Issue 59) is dedicated to explaining the financial plight of Country Joe & the Fish, the difficulty of playing the Matrix with two underage members (Bruce and Barry), etc..  If ED agrees, I will transcribe it and include it here.
Monday 03 October 1966 Country Joe and The Fish, Robbie Basho, The Juke Box [Benefit for the Berkeley Barb] Benefit for the Berkeley Barb and Benefit for the USI featuring CJ&F and "Other Deep Denizens" - including, according to ED Denson, Robbie Basho.
Wednesday 05 October 1966 Lightnin’ Hopkins The handbill for this show is identical to that used for appearances by Lightnin' Hopkins at The Matrix from October 7 thru October 16.
Thursday 06 October 1966 Lightnin’ Hopkins In late 1966 Jesse Cahn, son of Cabale founder Rolf Cahn and folksinger Barbara Dane, returned from playing drums for the Chambers Brothers on the East Coast to manage the Jabberwock for Bill Ehlert when he was called on to go over to The City (San Francisco) and manage the Matrix.  Jesse recalls “I also played drums with Lightnin' Hopkins at the Jabberwock while making sandwiches back in the kitchen ... it was a trip ... whip off my apron and run up on stage to play with po' Lightnin' and then back to the kitchen and try not to cut a finger off in the frantic transition...”.  Jesse continues “Country Joe and the Fish would rehearse in the afternoon while I swept up... Great times...”. 
Friday 07 October 1966 The New Age  
Saturday 08 October 1966 The New Age  
Sunday 09 October 1966 Hoot  
Monday 10 October 1966 Country Joe and The Fish  
Tuesday 11 October 1966 Country Joe and The Fish  
Wednesday 12 October 1966 Country Joe and The Fish  
Thursday 13 October 1966 Country Joe and The Fish  
Friday 14 October 1966 Country Joe and The Fish  
Saturday 15 October 1966 Country Joe and The Fish  
Sunday 16 October 1966 Country Joe and The Fish (2:00 pm and 4:00 pm); Hoot (9:00 pm)  
Tuesday 18 October 1966 Circus Maximus, Nepenthe By October 1966 the Jabberwock was booking more “rock” acts in to the Jabberwock – with shows featuring “house band” Country Joe and the Fish, Quicksilver Messenger Service, Blackburn and Snow, and Jerry Jeff Walker’s Circus Maximus.  Financially, his was to prove the most successful period in the Jabberwock’s history, although even then most of the money went to pay off debts.

Named after the ancient Roman hippodrome and mass entertainment venue, Circus Maximus was co-founded by Jerry Jeff Walker (born Ronald Clyde Crosby) and Bob Bruno in Los Angeles in 1966.  They managed a minor West Coast hit with Bob Bruno's song "Wind", from their first album. The poster for their October 18-20, 1966 shows at the Jabberwock is an adapted version of that being used for a show by The Only Alternative and His Other Possibilities at the Matrix (opening on the same night!).  Blues singer Nepenthe provided support for these shows. 

Bill Ehlert had at this time a manager running the Jabberwock and had gone to manage the Matrix for a couple of months around September and October 1966.  This is evidenced by a sudden run of Matrix posters produced by Jabberwock artist-in-residence, Tom Weller, and the appearance of a number of Jabberwock regulars at the Matrix (e.g. Country Joe and the Fish, the New Age, Robbie Basho).
 
Wednesday 19 October 1966 Circus Maximus, Nepenthe In late December 1967, Circus Maximus performed in an unusual pair of "Electric Christmas" concerts together with the New York Pro Musica, an ensemble devoted to performing early music. The 80-minute performance at the New York City - rehearsed in the nightclub Electric Circus where Circus Maximus were in residence much of that month, but performed at Carnegie Hall included a light show by Anthony Martin and electronic music by Morton Subotnick; the groups performed both together and separately. The material performed together included a reworking 14th-century composer Guillaume de Machaut's "La douce dame jolie" as an English-language song "Sweet Lovely Lady" and a Bruno original "Chess Game" that, unbeknownst to Bruno himself but noted by John White, director of the Pro Musica, strongly echoed the "Romanesca", a piece first written down in 16th-century Spanish lute books. The concert was not a critical success and by July 1968 the band had broken up.   Walker, best know for writing Mr Bojangles, moved toward a successful career in country music and Bob Bruno moved further in to the realms of his favoured jazz world.
Thursday 20 October 1966 Circus Maximus, Nepenthe During the run of these Circus Maximus shows, Campbell Coe photographed the band in the back room at the Jabberwock with Barry Melton of Country Joe and the Fish.
Friday 21 October 1966 Blackburn & Snow  
Saturday 22 October 1966 Blackburn & Snow  
Sunday 23 October 1966 Hoot This is the last Sunday night Hoot for a while. There are so many groups and performers in Berkeley that Sunday night becomes a regular night for shows, often with afternoon shows featuring a different performer.
Monday 24 October 1966 Country Joe and The Fish The first in a "series of seven repertory concerts" by Country Joe and the Fish at the Jabberwock.
Tuesday 25 October 1966 Quicksilver Messenger Service  
Wednesday 26 October 1966 Quicksilver Messenger Service The October 26 show is reviewed by Berkeley diarist Faren Miller.  Quicksilver’s first set is Babe I’m Gonna Leave You, Hoochie Coochie Man, Pride of Man, I Hear You Knocking (vocals by Jim Murray), Codeine and Acapulco Gold and Silver.  The second set begins at 11:00 and kicks off with a 20-minute version of Smokestack Lightning, but the 16-year old Miller has to go to high school the next morning and leaves.
Thursday 27 October 1966 Quicksilver Messenger Service  
Friday 28 October 1966 Robbie Basho, Dan Paik  
Saturday 29 October 1966 Robbie Basho, Dan Paik  
Sunday 30 October 1966 Country Joe and The Fish (2:00 pm and 4:00 pm); Hoot: Freewheelin' McClure Montana (9:00 pm) Evening performances at 9:30 pm and 11 pm.  This was an "only in Berkeley" event. Freewheelin' McClure Montana was the name adopted by Freewheelin' Frank Reynolds (Secretary of San Francisco’s Hells Angels), Beat poet literature instructor at Oakland’s California College of Arts & Crafts, Michael McClure, and electronic composer and multi-instrumentalist George Montana.  Freewheelin' Frank, though a genuine rough-and-tough Angel, had a literary and musical bent, and would accompany McClure (along with “Montana”) as he read his poetry.  McClure later helped Frank write a book and was quoted of the Freewheelin' McClure Montana performances as saying "we played a few gigs and we sounded somewhere between drunken cowboy music and Shiva hymns".  Michael McClure bought with him a fifteen foot long boa constrictor in a sack.  McClure sat the sack next to him on stage; predictably, the snake escaped. 
Monday 31 October 1966 Country Joe and The Fish (9:00 pm and 11:00 pm)  
Tuesday 01 November 1966 Country Joe and The Fish  
Wednesday 02 November 1966 Country Joe and The Fish  
Thursday 03 November 1966 Country Joe and The Fish  
Friday 04 November 1966 Sweets Mill Mountain Boys plus after hours (3:00 am) jam with members of Country Joe and the Fish and The Second Coming, together with a topless go-go dancer from North Beach  
Saturday 05 November 1966 Sweets Mill Mountain Boys  
Sunday 06 November 1966 Country Joe and The Fish [Afternoon Workshop Series], Sweets Mill Mountain Blues [Evening Show]  
Monday 07 November 1966 Country Joe and The Fish [Evening Repertory Concert Series], San Andreas Fault A full page advertisement for these shows appeared in Issue 11 of Mojo Navigator.
Tuesday 08 November 1966 Country Joe and The Fish, San Andreas Fault  
Wednesday 09 November 1966 Country Joe and The Fish, San Andreas Fault  
Thursday 10 November 1966 Country Joe and The Fish, San Andreas Fault  
Friday 11 November 1966 San Andreas Fault It’s not clear if the band is related to the similarly named poster artist (Todd Hunter).
Sunday 13 November 1966 Country Joe and The Fish [Afternoon Workshop Series]  
Monday 14 November 1966 Country Joe and The Fish [Evening Repertory Concert Series]    
Tuesday 15 November 1966 Nick Gravenites Gravenites was a blues singer from Chicago who had spent some time in San Francisco around 1963, one of the early wave of Chicago transplants who helped define the San Francisco scene. He had returned in 1966. In the next year, he would start the Electric Flag with Mike Bloomfield.
Wednesday 16 November 1966 Nick Gravenites  
Thursday 17 November 1966 Nick Gravenites  
Friday 18 November 1966 Pat Kilroy and the New Age  At this time, The New Age was living in the Santa Cruz mountains and spending all their time meditating and practicing their music, only driving into town for shows.
Saturday 19 November 1966 Pat Kilroy and the New Age   
Sunday 20 November 1966 Country Joe and The Fish  [Afternoon Workshop Series], Pat Kilroy and the New Age [Eveneing Show] Various flyers and other information conflict for November 15-21.  The dates herein are based on those pulled from the Scenedrome section of the Berkeley Barb
Monday 21 November 1966 Country Joe and The Fish [Evening Repertory Concert Series]    
Tuesday 22 November 1966 Missippippi Fred McDowell  
Wednesday 23 November 1966 Missippippi Fred McDowell  
Thursday 24 November 1966 Missippippi Fred McDowell  
Friday 25 November 1966 John Fahey  
Saturday 26 November 1966 John Fahey  
Sunday 27 November 1966 Country Joe and The Fish [Afternoon Workshop Series], John Fahey [Evening Show] By December, Country Joe and The Fish have signed with Vanguard Records, who needs them to get serious about recording.  A friend of ED Denson’s arranged a show “for the mind and body” at the Hot Springs down the coast at Big Sur on December 7, 1966. The band was to play for $1 donations that would fund a week away from the Bay Area where the band could generally relax a little and put in some practice.  Shows were also put on at Stockton and, on December 3, at the Barn in Scott's Valley.  Subsequently, Country Joe and The Fish get a "real" rehearsal space at the Sausalito Heliport. The Heliport rents space to the Dead, Quicksilver and many other groups, as the helicopters drown out any noise from the rock bands.

It was this line up, with Chicken Hirsh, that was to go on and record Electric Music for the Mind and Body in January and February of 1967 for Vanguard, a record so good that Ralph J Gleason of the SF Chronicle remarked it should only be played on religious occasions.
 
Monday 28 November 1966 Country Joe and The Fish [Evening Repertory Concert Series]   This is the last Country Joe and the Fish show at the Jabberwock.  Country Joe and The Fish are now on their way to becoming international legends, and while they will play Berkeley many times in the future, they do not play the Jabberwock again.  Shortly after this show, John Francis Gunning is fired and Chicken Hirsch (who had played the Jabberwock with Blackburn and Snow in October 1966) takes over on drums, finger cymbals and assorted "background sounds".  Chicken was recommended by David Cohen, who had also had a brief sojourn in the company of Blackburn and Snow.  John Francis Gunning later went on to play with Eddy Brown and his Brown Bag.  
Tuesday 29 November 1966 Mance Lipscomb Mance Lipscomb was born in Texas in 1895, the son of a slave. Although he played music all his life, he never recorded until he was in his 60’s. East Bay resident and Arhoolie Records principal Chris Strachwitz was instrumental in finding and recording Lipscomb. Lipscomb represented a “songster” tradition that preceded the blues, and included a wide variety of black and white song traditions (including the blues). Lipscomb was a fine performer and a popular person who did well at Folk Festivals and with the new market for ‘rediscovered’ singers. Lipscomb recorded several albums on Arhoolie, and he was the subject of a documentary film by Les Blank called A Well Spent Life. He died in 1976.
Wednesday 30 November 1966 Mance Lipscomb  
Thursday 01 December 1966 Mance Lipscomb  
Friday 02 December 1966 John Hammond A full page advertisement for these shows appeared in Issue 11 of Mojo Navigator.  John Paul Hammond was the son of the great record producer John Hammond. The younger Hammond (not ‘Junior’, as his middle name was different) went to free-thinking Antioch College with Jorma Kaukonen in the early 1960s. In about 1962, Hammond made an album of songs by early blues artists like Skip James. At the time, those records were only available as old 78s, and Hammond’s record was instrumental in making people aware of this music before many of these records, or the people who made them were re-discovered. Hammond was a fine, if derivative guitarist and singer in both electric and acoustic settings. He recorded several albums for Vanguard, his most recent having been So Many Roads in 1965, backed by an electric group that featured members of The Hawks (later The Band) and Mike Bloomfield. When he played the Avalon, he was billed as Johnny Hammond and His Screaming Nighthawks, but he played this Jabberwock show solo. 
Saturday 03 December 1966 John Hammond  
Sunday 04 December 1966 John Hammond  
Monday 05 December 1966 Hoot with Larry Hanks  
Tuesday 06 December 1966 Robbie Basho, Dan Paik, Cleanliness & Godliness Skiffle Band Dan Paik was probably a member of the Cleanliness and Godliness Skiffle Band at this time, but presumably also played solo.  The CGSB was another outgrowth of the Instant Action Jug Band. The early incarnation featured Phil Marsh and Annie Johnston (guitars and vocals), Will Scarlett (harmonica), Dan Paik and Carlin Arriola.  The exact instrumentation is hard to determine.
Wednesday 07 December 1966 Robbie Basho, Dan Paik, Cleanliness & Godliness Skiffle Band  
Thursday 08 December 1966 Robbie Basho, Dan Paik, Cleanliness & Godliness Skiffle Band  
Friday 09 December 1966 Kathy and Carol  
Saturday 10 December 1966 Kathy and Carol  
Sunday 11 December 1966 Kathy and Carol  
Monday 12 December 1966 Hoot with Larry Hanks  
Tuesday 13 December 1966 Ellen Faust Brandywine  “Songs of Love, Murder, Voyage and Return” says the handbill.
Wednesday 14 December 1966 Ellen Faust Brandywine   
Thursday 15 December 1966 Ellen Faust Brandywine   
Friday 16 December 1966 Pat Kilroy and The New Age  
Saturday 17 December 1966 Pat Kilroy and The New Age  
Sunday 18 December 1966 Pat Kilroy and The New Age  
Monday 19 December 1966 Hoot  
Tuesday 20 December 1966 Don Garrett  
Wednesday 21 December 1966 Don Garrett  
Thursday 22 December 1966 Don Garrett  
Friday 23 December 1966